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First people and animals were not mammals and they had wings/women laid eggs/Serpent saved Adam

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  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

    In the ancient Greek myths, ambrosia (/æmˈbroʊʒə/, Ancient Greek: ἀμβροσία, "immortality") is the food or drink of the Greek gods,[1] often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it.[2] It was brought to the gods in Olympus by doves and served by either Hebe or Ganymede at the heavenly feast.[3][4]

    Ambrosia is sometimes depicted in ancient art as distributed by a nymph labeled with that name and a nurse of Dionysus.[5] In the myth of Lycurgus, the king attacked Ambrosia and Dionysus' entourage, causing the god to drive Lycurgus insane.

    Ambrosia is very closely related to the gods' other form of sustenance, nectar. The two terms may not have originally been distinguished;[6] though in Homer's poems nectar is usually the drink and ambrosia the food of the gods; it was with ambrosia Hera "cleansed all defilement from her lovely flesh",[7] and with ambrosia Athena prepared Penelope in her sleep,[8] so that when she appeared for the final time before her suitors, the effects of years had been stripped away, and they were inflamed with passion at the sight of her. On the other hand, in Alcman,[9] nectar is the food, and in Sappho[10] and Anaxandrides, ambrosia is the drink.[11] A character in Aristophanes' Knights says, "I dreamed the goddess poured ambrosia over your head—out of a ladle." Both descriptions could be correct, as ambrosia could be a liquid considered a food (such as honey).

    The consumption of ambrosia was typically reserved for divine beings. Upon his assumption into immortality on Olympus, Heracles is given ambrosia by Athena, while the hero Tydeus is denied the same thing when the goddess discovers him eating human brains. In one version of the myth of Tantalus, part of Tantalus' crime is that after tasting ambrosia himself, he attempts to steal some away to give to other mortals.[12] Those who consume ambrosia typically had not blood in their veins, but ichor, the blood of immortals.[13]

    Both nectar and ambrosia are fragrant, and may be used as perfume: in the Odyssey Menelaus and his men are disguised as seals in untanned seal skins, "...and the deadly smell of the seal skins vexed us sore; but the goddess saved us; she brought ambrosia and put it under our nostrils."[14] Homer speaks of ambrosial raiment, ambrosial locks of hair, even the gods' ambrosial sandals.

    Among later writers, ambrosia has been so often used with generic meanings of "delightful liquid" that such late writers as Athenaeus, Paulus and Dioscurides employ it as a technical terms in contexts of cookery,[15] medicine,[16] and botany.[17] Pliny used the term in connection with different plants, as did early herbalists.
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    Rishi (Sanskrit: ऋषि IAST: ṛṣi) is a Vedic term for an accomplished and enlightened person. Rishis have composed hymns of the Vedas. Post-Vedic tradition of Hinduism regards the rishis as "great sadhus" or "sages" who after intense meditation (tapas) realized the supreme truth and eternal knowledge, which they composed into hymns.

    According to Indian tradition, the word may be derived from two different meanings of the root 'rsh'. Sanskrit grammarians[2] derive this word from the second meaning: "to go, to move".[3] V. S. Apte[4] gives this particular meaning and derivation, and Monier-Williams[5] also gives the same, with some qualification.

    Another form of this root means "to flow, to move near by flowing". (All the meanings and derivations cited above are based upon Sanskrit English Dictionary of Monier-Williams).[5] Monier-Williams also quotes Tārānātha who compiled the great (Sanskrit-to-Sanskrit) dictionary named "ṛṣati jñānena saṃsāra-pāram" (i.e., "one who reaches beyond this mundane world by means of spiritual knowledge").

    More than a century ago, Monier-Williams tentatively suggested a derivation from drś "to see".[6] Monier-Williams also quotes the Hibernian (Irish) form arsan (a sage, a man old in wisdom) and arrach (old, ancient, aged) as related to rishi. Monier-Williams also conjectures that the root drish (to see) might have given rise to an obsolete root rish meaning "to see".

    However, the root has a close Avestan cognate ərəšiš[7] "an ecstatic" (see also Yurodivy, Vates). Yet the Indo-European dictionary of Julius Pokorny connects the word to a PIE root *h3er-s meaning "rise, protrude", in the sense of "excellent" and thus cognate with Ṛta and right and Asha. In Sanskrit, forms of the root rish become arsh- in many words, (e.g., arsh)

    Modern etymological explanations such as by Manfred Mayrhofer in his Etymological Dictionary[8] leave the case open, and do not prefer a connection to ṛṣ "pour, flow" (PIE *h1ers), rather one with German rasen "to be ecstatic, be in a different state of mind" (and perhaps Lithuanian aršus).

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    Post-Vedic tradition regards the Rishis as "sages" or saints, constituting a peculiar class of divine human beings in the early mythical system, as distinct from Asuras, Devas and mortal men. Swami Vivekananda described "Rishi"s as Mantra-drashtas or "the seers of thought". He told— "The truth came to the Rishis of India — the Mantra-drashtâs, the seers of thought — and will come to all Rishis in the future, not to talkers, not to book-swallowers, not to scholars, not to philologists, but to seers of thought."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amrita
    Amrita (Sanskrit: अमृत, IAST: amṛta), Amrit or Amata (also called Sudha, Amiy, Ami) literally means "immortality" and is often referred to in ancient Indian texts as nectar. "Amṛta" is etymologically related to the Greek ambrosia[1] and carries the same meaning.[2] Its first occurrence is in the Rigveda, where it is considered one of several synonyms for soma, the drink of the devas.

    Amrita is repeatedly referred to as the drink of the devas, which grants them immortality. Despite this, the nectar does not actually offer true immortality. Instead, by partaking it, the devas were able to attain a higher level of knowledge and power, which they had lost due to the curse of Sage Durvasa, as described in the samudra manthana legend. It tells how the devas, after the curse, begin to lose their immortality. Assisted by their rivals, the asuras, the devas begin to churn the ocean, releasing (among other extraordinary objects and beings) the amrita.[3]

    Amrita is sometimes said to miraculously form on, or flow from, statues of Hindu gods. The substance is consumed by worshippers and is alleged to be sweet-tasting and not at all similar to honey or sugar water. Amrita was the last of the fourteen treasures that emerged from the churning of the ocean and contained in a pot borne by Dhanvantari, the physician of the devas.

    Amrita is repeatedly referred to as the drink of the devas, which grants them immortality. Despite this, the nectar does not actually offer true immortality. Instead, by partaking it, the devas were able to attain a higher level of knowledge and power, which they had lost due to the curse of Sage Durvasa, as described in the samudra manthana legend. It tells how the devas, after the curse, begin to lose their immortality. Assisted by their rivals, the asuras, the devas begin to churn the ocean, releasing (among other extraordinary objects and beings) the amrita.

    In Vishnu Purana, Vayu Purana and Padma Purana, a curse that Durvasa laid upon Indra is described as the indirect reason for the famous churning of the ocean. The Srimad Bhagavata and Agni Purana also mention Durvasa's involvement in the episode in passing, without going into the details. Other sources for this story, such as Ramayana, Mahabharata, Harivamsa and Matsya Purana, do not mention Durvasa's involvement at all and ascribe the incident to other causes, such as the devas' and asuras' desire for immortality.
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    Among Baal's titles were "Rider of the Clouds," "Almighty," and "Lord of the Earth." He was the god of both fertility and the thunderstorm, as well as a mighty warrior, sometimes a sun god and the protector of crops and livestock.
    httpsuploadwikimediaorgwikipediacommons44aGelder2C_Aert_de_-_The_Baptism_of_Christ_-_c_1710jpg
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Annunciation,_with_Saint_Emidius#/media/File:The_Annunciation,_with_Saint_Emidius_-_Carlo_Crivelli_-_National_Gallery.jpg
    The Annunciation with Saint Emidius - Carlo Crivelli - National Galleryjpg
    httpsuploadwikimediaorgwikipediacommons55fCrucifixion_of_Christ_-_Visoki_DeC48Dani_Monasteryjpg
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

    Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin has pointed out that early Christian and Islamic traditions call Hermes Trismegistus the builder of the Pyramids of Giza[26] and has a major place in Islamic tradition. He writes, "Hermes Trismegistus is mentioned in the Quran in verse 19:56-57: 'Mention, in the Book, Idris, that he was truthful, a prophet. We took him up to a high place'". The Jabirian corpus contains the oldest documented source for the Emerald Tablet of Hermes Trismegistus, translated by Jābir ibn Hayyān (Geber) for the Hashemite Caliph of Baghdad Harun al-Rashid the Abbasid. Jābir ibn Hayyān, a Shiite, identified as Jābir al-Sufi, was a student of Ja'far al-Sadiq, Husayn ibn 'Ali's great grandson. Thus, for the Abbasid's and the Alid's, the writings of Hermes Trismegistus were considered sacred, as an inheritance from the Ahl al-Bayt and the Prophets. These writings were recorded by the Ikhwan al-Safa, and subsequently translated from Arabic into Persian, Turkish, Hebrew, Russian, and English. In these writings, Hermes Trismegistus is identified as Idris, the infallible Prophet who traveled to outer space from Egypt, and to heaven, whence he brought back a cache of objects from the Eden of Adam and the Black Stone from where he landed on earth in India.[27]

    According to ancient Arab genealogists, the Prophet Muhammad, who is also believed to have traveled to the heavens on the night of Isra and Mi'raj, is a direct descendant of Hermes Trismegistus. Ibn Kathir said, "As for Idris... He is in the genealogical chain of the Prophet Muhammad, except according to one genealogist... Ibn Ishaq says he was the first who wrote with the Pen. There was a span of 380 years between him and the life of Adam. Many of the scholars allege that he was the first to speak about this, and they call him Thrice-Great Hermes [Hermes Trismegistus]".[27] Ahmad al-Buni considered himself a follower of the hermetic teachings; and his contemporary Ibn Arabi mentioned Hermes Trismegistus in his writings. The Futūḥāt al-Makkiyya of Ibn Arabi speaks of Hermes's travels to "vast cities (outside earth), possessing technologies far superior than ours"[28] and meeting with the Twelfth Imam, the Ninth (generation) from the Third (al-Husayn the third Imam) (referring here to the Masters of Wisdom from the Emerald Tablet), who also ascended to the heavens, and is still alive like his ancestor Hermes Trismegistus".[29]

    A late Arabic writer wrote of the Sabaeans that their religion had a sect of star worshipers who held their doctrine to come from Hermes Trismegistus through the prophet Adimun.[30]

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    edited July 25
    Antoine Faivre, in The Eternal Hermes (1995), has pointed out that Hermes Trismegistus has a place in the Islamic tradition, although the name Hermes does not appear in the Qur'an. Hagiographers and chroniclers of the first centuries of the Islamic Hegira quickly identified Hermes Trismegistus with Idris,[31] the nabi of surahs 19.57 and 21.85, whom the Arabs also identified with Enoch (cf. Genesis 5.18–24). Idris/Hermes was termed "Thrice-Wise" Hermes Trismegistus because he had a threefold origin. The first Hermes, comparable to Thoth, was a "civilizing hero", an initiator into the mysteries of the divine science and wisdom that animate the world; he carved the principles of this sacred science in hieroglyphs. The second Hermes, in Babylon, was the initiator of Pythagoras. The third Hermes was the first teacher of alchemy. "A faceless prophet," writes the Islamicist Pierre Lory, "Hermes possesses no concrete or salient characteristics, differing in this regard from most of the major figures of the Bible and the Quran."[32] A common interpretation of the representation of "Trismegistus" as "thrice great" recalls the three characterizations of Idris: as a messenger of god, or a prophet; as a source of wisdom, or hikmet (wisdom from hokmah); and as a king of the world order, or a "sultanate". These are referred to as müselles bin ni'me.
    Post edited by KingNaid on
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramadan
    Ramadan (/ˌræməˈdɑːn/, also US: /ˌrɑːm-, ˈræmədɑːn, ˈrɑːm-/,[6][7][8] UK: /ˈræmədæn/;[9]) or Ramazan (Arabic: رَمَضَان‎, romanizedRamaḍān [ra.ma.dˤaːn];[note 1] also spelled Ramzan, Ramadhan, or Ramathan) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar,[10] observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting (sawm), prayer, reflection and community.[11] A commemoration of Muhammad's first revelation,[12] the annual observance of Ramadan is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam[13] and lasts twenty-nine to thirty days, from one sighting of the crescent moon to the next.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raamah

    Raamah or Rama is a name found in the Bible (Hebrew: רעמה, Ra‛mâh), means "lofty" or "exalted" and also may mean "thunder".

    The name is first mentioned as the fourth son of Cush, who is the son of Ham, who is the son of Noah in Gen. 10:7, and later appears as a country that traded with the Phoenician city-state of Tyre, in Ezekiel 27:22. It has been connected with Rhammanitae mentioned by Strabo in the southwest Arabian Peninsula, and with an Arabian city of Regmah at the head of the Persian Gulf.

    This country of Raamah is usually assumed to be somewhere in the region of Yemen; Sheba was a son of Raamah, and his descendants are often held to be included among the Sabaeans. Dedan, son of Raamah. Apparently a region of the Medina Province of Saudi Arabia.

    However, there was also an Israelite city called Ramah, somewhat closer to Tyre.

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_wrestling_with_the_angel
    Jacob wrestling with the angel is described in Genesis (32:22–32; also referenced in Hosea 12:4). The "angel" in question is referred to as "man" (אִישׁ) and "god" (baal/marduk) in Genesis, while Hosea references an "angel" (מַלְאָךְ).[1] The account includes the renaming of Jacob as Israel (etymologized as "contends-with-god"). (baal/marduk)

    In the Genesis narrative, Jacob spent the night alone on a riverside during his journey back to Canaan. He encounters a "man" who proceeds to wrestle with him until daybreak. In the end, Jacob is given the name "Israel" and blessed, while the "man" refuses to give his own name. Jacob then names the place where they wrestled Penuel

    Israel (etymologized as "contends-with-god")

    Specific deities known as ʼEl or ʼIl include the supreme god of the ancient Canaanite religion[3] and the supreme god of East Semitic speakers in Mesopotamia's Early Dynastic Period.

    For the Canaanites and the ancient Levantine region as a whole, Ēl or Il was the supreme god, the father of mankind and all creatures.[20] He also fathered many gods, most importantly Hadad, Yam, and Mot, each sharing similar attributes to the Greco-Roman gods: Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades respectively.

    As recorded on the clay tablets of Ugarit, El is the husband of the goddess Asherah.

    Three pantheon lists found at Ugarit (modern Ras ShamrāArabic: رأس شمرا‎, Syria) begin with the four gods ’il-’ib (which according to Cross;[21] is the name of a generic kind of deity, perhaps the divine ancestor of the people), Ēl, Dagnu (that is Dagon), and Ba’l Ṣapān (that is the god Haddu or Hadad).[21] Though Ugarit had a large temple dedicated to Dagon and another to Hadad, there was no temple dedicated to Ēl.

    Ēl is called again and again Tôru ‘Ēl ("Bull Ēl" or "the bull god"). He is bātnyu binwāti ("Creator of creatures"), ’abū banī ’ili ("father of the gods"), and ‘abū ‘adami ("father of man"). He is qāniyunu ‘ôlam ("creator eternal"), the epithet ‘ôlam appearing in Hebrew form in the Hebrew name of God ’ēl ‘ôlam "God Eternal" in Genesis 21.33. He is ḥātikuka ("your patriarch"). Ēl is the grey-bearded ancient one, full of wisdom, malku ("King"), ’abū šamīma ("Father of years"), ’El gibbōr ("Ēl the warrior"). He is also named lṭpn of unknown meaning, variously rendered as Latpan, Latipan, or Lutpani ("shroud-face" by Strong's Hebrew Concordance).

    "El" (Father of Heaven / Saturn) and his major son: "Hadad" (Father of Earth / Jupiter), are symbolized both by the bull, and both wear bull horns on their headdresses.[22][23][24][25]

    In Canaanite mythology, El builds a desert sanctuary with his children and his two wives, leading to speculation[by whom?] that at one point El was a desert god.

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

    In the Hebrew Bible, the word elohim (Hebrew: אֱלֹהִים [(ʔ)eloˈ(h)im]) sometimes refers to a single deity, particularly (but not always) the Jewish God,[1][2] at other times it refers to deities in the plural.[1][2]

    The word is the plural form of the word eloah[3][4][5] and related to el, which means gods or magistrates, and it is cognate to the word 'l-h-m which is found in Ugaritic, where it is used as the pantheon for Canaanite gods, the children of El, and conventionally vocalized as "Elohim". Most uses of the term Elohim in the later Hebrew text imply a view that is at least monolatrist at the time of writing, and such usage (in the singular), as a proper title for the supreme deity, is generally not considered to be synonymous with the term elohim, "gods" (plural, simple noun). Rabbinic scholar Maimonides wrote that the various other usages are commonly understood to be homonyms.[6]

    The notion of divinity underwent radical changes in the early period of Israelite identity and development of Ancient Hebrew religion. The ambiguity of the term elohim is the result of such changes, cast in terms of "vertical translatability", i.e. the re-interpretation of the gods of the earliest recalled period as the national god of monolatrism as it emerged in the 7th to 6th century BCE in the Kingdom of Judah and during the Babylonian captivity, and further in terms of monotheism by the emergence of Rabbinical Judaism in the 2nd century CE.
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

    The word elohim or 'elohiym (ʼĕlôhîym) is a grammatically plural noun for "gods" or "deities" or various other words in Biblical Hebrew.[8]

    In Hebrew, the ending -im normally indicates a masculine plural. However, when referring to the Jewish God, Elohim is usually understood to be grammatically singular (i.e. it governs a singular verb or adjective).[9][10] In Modern Hebrew, it is often referred to in the singular despite the -im ending that denotes plural masculine nouns in Hebrew.[11][12]

    It is generally thought that Elohim is derived from eloah, the latter being an expanded form of the Northwest Semitic noun ’il.[13][14] The related nouns eloah (אלוה) and el (אֵל) are used as proper names or as generics, in which case they are interchangeable with elohim.[14] The term contains an added heh as third radical to the biconsonantal root. Discussions of the etymology of elohim essentially concern this expansion. An exact cognate outside of Hebrew is found in Ugaritic ʾlhm,[13] the family of El, the creator god and chief deity of the Canaanite pantheon, in Biblical Aramaic ʼĔlāhā and later Syriac Alaha ("God"), and in Arabic ʾilāh ("god, deity") (or Allah as "The [single] God").[15] "El" (the basis for the extended root ʾlh) is usually derived from a root meaning "to be strong" and/or "to be in front".

    The word el (singular) is a standard term for "god" in Aramaic, paleo-Hebrew, and other related Semitic languages including Ugaritic. The Canaanite pantheon of gods was known as 'ilhm,[16] the Ugaritic equivalent to elohim.[1] For instance, in the Ugaritic Baal Cycle we read of "seventy sons of Asherah". Each "son of god" was held to be the originating deity for a particular people.

    Elohim occurs frequently throughout the Torah. In some cases (e.g. Exodus 3:4, "Elohim called unto him out of the midst of the bush ..."), it behaves like a singular noun in Hebrew grammar, and is then generally understood to denote the single God of Israel. In other cases, Elohim acts as an ordinary plural of the word Eloah, and refers to the polytheistic notion of multiple gods (for example, Exodus 20:3, "You shall have no other gods before me").

    The word Elohim occurs more than 2500 times in the Hebrew Bible, with meanings ranging from "gods" in a general sense (as in Exodus 12:12, where it describes "the gods of Egypt"), to specific gods (e.g., 1 Kings 11:33, where it describes Chemosh "the god of Moab", or the frequent references to Yahweh as the "elohim" of Israel), to demons, seraphim, and other supernatural beings, to the spirits of the dead brought up at the behest of King Saul in 1 Samuel 28:13, and even to kings and prophets (e.g., Exodus 4:16).[14] The phrase bene elohim, translated "sons of the Gods", has an exact parallel in Ugaritic and Phoenician texts, referring to the council of the gods.
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elahi

    Christian use

    Some scholars believe Elahi may be the name of God that Jesus vocalized in his last words on the cross. Science historian Livio Catullo Stecchini and Jan Sammer write, "The limits of Mark‘s knowledge of Hebrew are revealed by the sentence Eloi Eloi Lama Sabachthani which he puts into the mouth of Jesus. It is a confused rendering into Greek lettering of the text of Psalm 22:2, which reads in Hebrew eli eli lama azabtani and in Aramaic elahi elahi lema sebaqtani."[3]

    Muslim use as proper name

    Deemed a heresy or blasphemous by Israelites, the name Elahi would never be taken on as a personal name by adherents of the Jewish tradition. However, the personal name has been gradually popularized within Persian and Indo-Aryan cultural traditions. The name has appeared in Kurdish, Azeri, and Persian languages.

    With the arrival of Islam in the Subcontinent, the name migrated into South Asia adding to the etymological progression of the word. Islam, an Abrahamic faith which evolved out of Semitic Arabia, provided the linguistic and cultural conduit for the transfer of the name. The Muslims of medieval South Asia adopted the name in small numbers. For example, the former deputy prime minister of Pakistan, Chaudhry Pervaiz Elahi. The name is also found in neighbouring Afghanistan.

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    "About the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, "ELI, ELI, LAMA SABACHTHANI?" that is, "MY GOD, MY GOD, WHY HAVE YOU FORSAKEN ME?"[Matthew 27:46, Mark 15:34, Psalm 22:1]
    Greek:
    περὶ δὲ τὴν ἐνάτην ὥραν ἀνεβόησεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς φωνῇ μεγάλῃ λέγων· Ἠλὶ ἠλὶ λεμὰ σαβαχθάνι; τοῦτ’ ἔστιν· Θεέ μου θεέ μου, ἱνατί με ἐγκατέλιπες;
    Arabic:
    ونحو الساعة التاسعة صرخ يسوع بصوت عظيم قائلا ايلي ايلي لما شبقتني اي الهي الهي لماذا تركتني.
    Hebrew Text Psalm 22:1
    לַ֭מְנַצֵּחַ עַל־אַיֶּ֥לֶת הַשַּׁ֗חַר מִזְמֹ֥ור לְדָוִֽד׃ אֵלִ֣י אֵ֭לִי לָמָ֣ה עֲזַבְתָּ֑נִי רָחֹ֥וק מִֽ֝ישׁוּעָתִ֗י דִּבְרֵ֥י שַׁאֲגָתִֽי׃

    ’ê-lî אֵלִ֣י My God  [http://biblehub.com/text/psalms/22-1.htm ]
    The Islamic way to profess faith is to recite, declare; Kalimah Tayyibah kalimat aṭ-ṭaiyibah (Word of Purity), shahada. 
    لَا إِلٰهَ إِلَّا الله مُحَمَّدٌ رَسُولُ الله
    'lā ilāha illā -llāh, muḥammadur rasūlu -llāh
    There is no god (ilaha) but Allah, [and] Muhammad is the messenger of Allah.
    The Arab Christians also use 'Allah' as name of God in the Arabic Bible.
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    edited May 25

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    edited May 27


    Post edited by KingNaid on
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    Dark matter is a form of matter thought to account for approximately 85% of the matter in the universe and about a quarter of its total energy density. Its presence is implied in a variety of astrophysical observations, including gravitational effects that cannot be explained by accepted theories of gravity unless more matter is present than can be seen. For this reason, most experts think that dark matter is abundant in the universe and that it has had a strong influence on its structure and evolution. Dark matter is called dark because it does not appear to interact with observable electromagnetic radiation, such as light, and so it is undetectable by existing astronomical instruments.[1] Primary evidence for dark matter comes from calculations showing that many galaxies would fly apart, or that they would not have formed or would not move as they do, if they did not contain a large amount of unseen matter.

    The Amplified Bible
    And He Himself existed before all things, and in Him all things consist (cohere, are held together).

    The Amplified Bible
    Can anyone hide himself in secret places so that I cannot see him? says the Lord. Do not I fill heaven and earth? says the Lord.

    1 Timothy 6:16
    who alone possesses immortality and dwells in unapproachable light, whom no man has seen or can see To Him be honor and eternal dominion!

    1 Timothy 1:17
    Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory forever and ever.

    Romans 1:20
    For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes, His eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly seen, being understood through what has been made, so that they are without excuse.



    1 In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, 2 the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters. 3 Then God said, "Let there be light"; and there was light. 4 And God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness.
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

    Exodus 33:20

    “And he said, Thou canst not see my face: for there shall no man see me, and live.”

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/craig-burrows-flowers-ultraviolet-light_n_58f4ff14e4b0b9e9848d7da6
    Take flowers, for instance. As beautiful as they are in normal lighting conditions, their true colors come out when you see them under ultraviolet light.
    For the past three years artist a hrefhttpwwwcpburrowscom target_blankCraig Burrowsa has been shining a lig
    Burrows combs his neighborhood in the Los Angeles-area looking for flowers and then puts them in a room that is as dark as h
    ldquoDoing UVIVF photography is actually something that got me into gardening since I wanted to grow certain flowers to ph
    Burrows is constantly surprised by his flower photographs Some plants just arenrsquot as UV photogenic as others
    ldquoI recently photographed some bottlebrush which I expected to be quite spectacularrdquo Burrowsnbspsaid ldquoI
    The most consistently colorful flowers arenbspsunflowers or flowers closely related to them Burrows has discovered ldqu
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prism

    An optical prism is a transparent optical element with flat, polished surfaces that refract light. At least one surface must be angled—elements with two parallel surfaces are not prisms. The traditional geometrical shape of an optical prism is that of a triangular prism with a triangular base and rectangular sides, and in colloquial use "prism" usually refers to this type. Some types of optical prism are not in fact in the shape of geometric prisms. Prisms can be made from any material that is transparent to the wavelengths for which they are designed. Typical materials include glass, plastic, and fluorite.

    A dispersive prism can be used to break white light up into its constituent spectral colors (the colors of the rainbow). Furthermore, prisms can be used to reflect light, or to split light into components with different polarizations.

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(waves)

    Polarization (also polarisation) is a property applying to transverse waves that specifies the geometrical orientation of the oscillations.[1][2][3][4][5] In a transverse wave, the direction of the oscillation is perpendicular to the direction of motion of the wave.[4] A simple example of a polarized transverse wave is vibrations traveling along a taut string (see image); for example, in a musical instrument like a guitar string. Depending on how the string is plucked, the vibrations can be in a vertical direction, horizontal direction, or at any angle perpendicular to the string. In contrast, in longitudinal waves, such as sound waves in a liquid or gas, the displacement of the particles in the oscillation is always in the direction of propagation, so these waves do not exhibit polarization. Transverse waves that exhibit polarization include electromagnetic waves such as light and radio waves, gravitational waves,[6] and transverse sound waves (shear waves) in solids.

    An electromagnetic wave such as light consists of a coupled oscillating electric field and magnetic field which are always perpendicular to each other; by convention, the "polarization" of electromagnetic waves refers to the direction of the electric field. In linear polarization, the fields oscillate in a single direction. In circular or elliptical polarization, the fields rotate at a constant rate in a plane as the wave travels. The rotation can have two possible directions; if the fields rotate in a right hand sense with respect to the direction of wave travel, it is called right circular polarization, while if the fields rotate in a left hand sense, it is called left circular polarization.

    Light or other electromagnetic radiation from many sources, such as the sun, flames, and incandescent lamps, consists of short wave trains with an equal mixture of polarizations; this is called unpolarized light. Polarized light can be produced by passing unpolarized light through a polarizer, which allows waves of only one polarization to pass through. The most common optical materials (such as glass) are isotropic and do not affect the polarization of light passing through them; however, some materials—those that exhibit birefringence, dichroism, or optical activity—can change the polarization of light. Some of these are used to make polarizing filters. Light is also partially polarized when it reflects from a surface.

    According to quantum mechanics, electromagnetic waves can also be viewed as streams of particles called photons. When viewed in this way, the polarization of an electromagnetic wave is determined by a quantum mechanical property of photons called their spin.[7][8] A photon has one of two possible spins: it can either spin in a right hand sense or a left hand sense about its direction of travel. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves are composed of photons with only one type of spin, either right- or left-hand. Linearly polarized waves consist of photons that are in a superposition of right and left circularly polarized states, with equal amplitude and phases synchronized to give oscillation in a plane.
  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363

    Magnetosphere rendition

    FileMagnetosphere renditionjpg
    prism

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    edited May 30

  • KingNaidKingNaid Member UncommonPosts: 1,363
    Light or other electromagnetic radiation from many sources, such as the sun, flames, and incandescent lamps, consists of short wave trains with an equal mixture of polarizations; this is called unpolarized light. Polarized light can be produced by passing unpolarized light through a polarizer, which allows waves of only one polarization to pass through.

    Lucifer (/ˈluːsɪfər/ 'light-bringer', corresponding to the Greek name Ἑωσφόρος, 'dawn-bringer', for the same planet) is a Latin name for the planet Venus in its morning appearances and is often used for mythological and religious figures associated with the planet. Due to the unique movements and discontinuous appearances of Venus in the sky, mythology surrounding these figures often involved a fall from the heavens to earth or the underworld. Interpretations of a similar term in the Hebrew Bible, translated in the King James Version as "Lucifer" as a proper name, led to a Christian tradition of applying the name Lucifer, and its associated stories of a fall from heaven, to Satan, but modern scholarship generally translates the term in the relevant Bible passage, (Isaiah 14:12), as "morning star" or "shining one" rather than as a proper name, "Lucifer".[1]

    As a name for the Devil, the more common meaning in English, "Lucifer" is the rendering of the Hebrew word הֵילֵל‎ (transliteration: hêylêl; pronunciation: hay-lale)[2] in Isaiah (Isaiah 14:12) given in the King James Version of the Bible. The translators of this version took the word from the Latin Vulgate,[3] which translated הֵילֵל by the Latin word lucifer (uncapitalized),[4][5] meaning "the morning star, the planet Venus", or, as an adjective, "light-bringing".[6]

    As a name for the planet in its morning aspect, "Lucifer" (Light-Bringer) is a proper name and is capitalized in English. In Greco-Roman civilization, it was often personified and considered a god[7] and in some versions considered a son of Aurora (the Dawn).[8] A similar name used by the Roman poet Catullus for the planet in its evening aspect is "Noctifer" (Night-Bringer).

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