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Will this PC run Star Wars: The Old Republic?

Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29
Hi everyone, I am new to this forum and any help would be much appreciated thanks!

I have very limited knowledge concerning computer specs, since the last time I upgraded was in 2001! However I have decided to go back to my MMO routes and would like to purchase the new Bioware Star Wars: The Old Republic.

My computer is sadly extremely old however and would like to know whether my current PC, with my intended upgrades, would suffice in playing the game on high'ish settings with a very stable frame rate?

My current specs are as followed: Dell Vostro 200

Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 2.3 GHz processor

2048 MB(2 GB) of DDR2 PC2-5300(DDR2-667) RAM

NVIDIA GeForce 8300GS 512 MB integrated graphics

320 GB hard drive


I understand I have an incredibly poor GPU and small pool of RAM, so my intended upgrades are:

Adding an additional 2GB of DDR2 RAM (in total 4GB).

Adding MSI ATI Radeon HD 6850 Cyclone Power Edition 1024MB GDDR5 PCI-Express Graphics Card.
http://www.overclockers.co.uk/search_results.php?sortby=&groupid=701&search=6850


So would my current PC, with the additional upgrades outlined, play the new Star Wars MMO near high settings and with a stable frame rate? And if not what settings would I (if at all) be able to play the game?

Any information/help would be greatly appreciated thanks! All I require is a cheap'ish upgrade that will allow me to play this game :)
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Comments

  • Chile267Chile267 Member UncommonPosts: 141


    Minimum Specs


    Operating System

    Star Wars ™: The Old Republic ™ can be played on Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7.


    Computer

    Your computer should have an AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual-Core 4000+ or better, and an Intel Core 2 Duo Processor 2.0GHz or better.


    RAM

    Your computer's RAM should be as follows: for Windows XP: 1.5GB, and for Windows Vista and Windows 7: 2GB. For PCs using a built-in graphical chipset, 2GB RAM recommended.


    Video

    Your computer's graphics card should be ATI X1800 or better, nVidia 7800 or better, or Intel 4100 Integrated Graphics or better.

    NOTE: Minimum of 256MB of on-board RAM and Shader 3.0 or better support.

    ------------------------------------------------------

    With these Specs you will need to turn things down low and turn shadows off.

  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29
    Thank you very much for the speedy reply. And I do apologise for my wall if text, I posted this through my mobile, which seems to have an aversion to paragraphs!

    Ah I see, that is a shame, so with my current specs and even the intended upgrades I would not be able to run settings higher than low? I guess I shall have to look into investing in a new PC instead
  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29
    Hi everyone, I am new to this forum and any help would be much appreciated thanks!

    I have very limited knowledge concerning computer specs, since the last time I upgraded was in 2001! However I have decided to go back to my MMO routes and would like to purchase the new Bioware Star Wars: The Old Republic.

    My computer is sadly extremely old however and would like to know whether my current PC, with my intended upgrades, would suffice in playing the game on high'ish settings with a very stable frame rate?

    My current specs are as followed: Dell Vostro 200

    Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 2.3 GHz processor

    2048 MB(2 GB) of DDR2 PC2-5300(DDR2-667) RAM

    NVIDIA GeForce 8300GS 512 MB integrated graphics

    320 GB hard drive


    I understand I have an incredibly poor GPU and small pool of RAM, so my intended upgrades are:

    Adding an additional 2GB of DDR2 RAM (in total 4GB).

    Adding MSI ATI Radeon HD 6850 Cyclone Power Edition 1024MB GDDR5 PCI-Express Graphics Card.
    http://www.overclockers.co.uk/search_results.php?sortby=&groupid=701&search=6850


    So would my current PC, with the additional upgrades outlined, play the new Star Wars MMO near high settings and with a stable frame rate? And if not what settings would I (if at all) be able to play the game?

    Any information/help would be greatly appreciated thanks! All I require is a cheap'ish upgrade that will allow me to play this game :)

    P.s. I am able to add paragraphs but not edit previous posts through the mobile version of the site it seems... here's my original post but easier to read.
  • KabaalKabaal Member UncommonPosts: 3,042

    With those upgrades it would play the game fine, a GTX460 plays the game at max settings with good frame rates and the 6850 is about on par with it. You might want to check your PSU is sufficent though, and the processor could do with overclocking to ~3Ghz to avoid any bottlenecking.

  • Loke666Loke666 Member EpicPosts: 21,441

    Originally posted by Clifford1987

    Hi everyone, I am new to this forum and any help would be much appreciated thanks! I have very limited knowledge concerning computer specs, since the last time I upgraded was in 2001! However I have decided to go back to my MMO routes and would like to purchase the new Bioware Star Wars: The Old Republic. My computer is sadly extremely old however and would like to know whether my current PC, with my intended upgrades, would suffice in playing the game on high'ish settings with a very stable frame rate? My current specs are as followed: Dell Vostro 200 Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 2.3 GHz processor 2048 MB(2 GB) of DDR2 PC2-5300(DDR2-667) RAM NVIDIA GeForce 8300GS 512 MB integrated graphics 320 GB hard drive I understand I have an incredibly poor GPU and small pool of RAM, so my intended upgrades are: Adding an additional 2GB of DDR2 RAM (in total 4GB). Adding MSI ATI Radeon HD 6850 Cyclone Power Edition 1024MB GDDR5 PCI-Express Graphics Card. http://www.overclockers.co.uk/search_results.php?sortby=&groupid=701&search=6850 So would my current PC, with the additional upgrades outlined, play the new Star Wars MMO near high settings and with a stable frame rate? And if not what settings would I (if at all) be able to play the game? Any information/help would be greatly appreciated thanks! All I require is a cheap'ish upgrade that will allow me to play this game :)

    While a good GPU would at least makethe game playable I think it is time to upgrade more than so. High setting probably wont work anyways.

    And it is possible that you will get problems fitting the card in the box, Dell often have special solutions so you need to check the space in the box.

    I reccommend upgrading computer at least every 5 years.

    Anyways, I suggest that you get one of those upgrade packs that have a motherboard, a CPU and ram together with a new graphics card. That might require you to modify the box a little but it should be fine with a little violence.

    Here is a nice combo deal for $270 bucks: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.790396

    It includes a 3,0 Ghx quad,a motherboard, 4 Gb ram, a case and a nice harddrive. Add an acceptable GFX card to it (like a Nvidia 260 GTX or a similar performing ATI card and your computer will be as new again and able to max out TOR fine.

    Last advice: check how much power your PSU can handle, you might need to change it to upgrade the GFX card in any way.

    Good luck.

  • cagarcagar Member Posts: 98
    IMHO you upgrade a comp 3 or 4 years old. Then next time you feel it's not up to your requirements, get a new comp.
    Why pour a few hundred dollars in upgrades into a comp 10 years old.

    70 monk eq1
    80 bruiser eq2
    43 druid wow
    Currently playing : rift

  • sldropsldrop Member Posts: 112

    I think u should upgarde on CPU

    my spec on bottom

    it lag VERY  bad in combat for me..,,so i skip swtor lol

    odd thing is i can run skyrim  and all other new game on low setting (didnt buy bf3 and mw3)

     


    Intel® Core™2 CPU 6400 @ 2.13GHz

    CPU SPEED:

    2.15 GHz

    SYSTEM MEMORY:

    3.5 GB

    VIDEO CARD MODEL:

    NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTS
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    The processor is a problem.  The processor should be able to run the game well enough to be playable, but it's not going to be entirely smooth, no matter what settings you pick.

    The video card you have is a huge problem, and would likely make the game unplayable at any settings.  But that's why you're trying to replace it.  The new card would be plenty fast enough to run most games at fairly high settings.

    But that's only if your system can handle it.  The case is a problem, and might be a huge problem.  From Dell's site, I found contradictory information as to whether it's a mini tower or a slim tower.  If the latter, then the overwhelming majority of gaming cards will not physically fit in the case.  You can tell yourself by getting out a ruler and measuring the width.  If it's about 5", that's a slim tower.  If it's about 8", that's normal width.

    But even if the card will fit, there's still the matter of cooling it.  It looks like a small case without much airflow.  It can presumably handle the low power hardware that it came with, but probably not a powerful gaming card.  Check how many case fans it has.  Give the exact number of fans, their sizes (80 mm and 120 mm are the most common), where they are positioned (front, back, side, top), and how they are oriented (blowing air into or out of the case).  If you've got two 120 mm fans and I just can't see them in the picture, then you're fine.  If it's trying to cool everything on a single 80 mm fan, then that's a problem.

    There are a few different ways to compensate for inadequate case airflow.  The simplest is that if there are places to add more fans, then use them to add more fans.  The case probably doesn't offer that, though.

    The next is to get an external exhaust video card that will dump most of the card's heat out the back of the case.  Most cards, including the one you picked, are internal exhaust, so that greatly restricts your options.

    A third option is to replace the case.  You'd probably rather avoid that if you can, but it will work.  If you've got a slim tower, then this is probably unavoidable.

    A fourth option is to modify the case yourself, and cut additional holes for case fans.  Case modding is very much enthusiast territory that you're probably not comfortable with, but it can be done.

    Finally, for a gaming system, you're going to need a stronger power supply.  Dell says it comes with a 300 W power supply, and that's not what you want for a Radeon HD 6850, or any other gaming card, for that matter.  If you've got a slim tower, then most power supplies won't physically fit in the case, which is why you have to replace it.  If it's a normal mini tower, then it's probably fine, but Dell sometimes does some custom form factor stuff to make normal parts incompatible.  You should measure your current power supply to see how big it is, and how much longer of a power supply will physically fit in the case.

  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29

    Firsty, thank you everyone for your quick replies, help and advice!  I did not expect so many response when I woke up this morning, it is extremely appreciated :)

     

    Kabaal - Thank you for your suggestion about purchasing a combo kit, I did not even know they existed!  After reading all the additional posts in this thread it seems I will require a more hefty upgrade than I initially thought, so this might be the perfect option.

     

    sldrop - Thanks for that piece of information, my specs are quite similar so clearly I need to have an upgrade if I want to play Star Wars: TOR.

     

    Quizzical - Thank you for your in depth reply!  I had a fear that my CPU might cause me problems, so it seems I definitely need a larger upgrade than initially planned.  I can answer some of your questions:

    Firstly, I thankfully have a mini tower and not the slim version, so I therefore have more space inside the case.  However, I only have one fan on the PSU, one on the CPU and one 80mm fan at the rear of the case that pulls in cool air over the motherboard.  It has additional ventilation at the front and an additional slot that is for a fan.  If I added one more fan at the front would that suffice?  If not I do have a old, large tower case that is currently a shell.  It has a lot of space inside and two fans already attached, would that be a better option?

    You are 100% correct, I currently have a 300W PSU, what size should I upgrade to if I went for additional modifications?  Would 650W suffice, or would it have to be larger?  Thanks again for all your help.

     

    Additional few questions....

    It seems to me that the best route would be an entire upgrade of my Mother Board, CPU, RAM and GPU.  As I currently have a limited budget it seems that my best option is to buy a combo pack (of mother board, CPU and RAM) and a GPU, do people agree?

    If so would this option allow me to play Star Wars: TOR on decent settings with a stable framerate?


    Xenon AMD Bulldozer FX-4 Quad Core 4100 3.60GHz Bundle: http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=BU-188-OK

     

    And the GPU I previously stated: ATI Radeon HD 6850 Cyclone Power Edition 1024MB GDDR5 PCI-Express Graphics Card.

     

    Additionally I would get a 650W PSU and an additional fan.  The only reason I have selected the above modifications is due to the fact I have a limited budget to upgrade.  I have no idea whether these items are actually good or not, so if anyone can recommend any better CPU, RAM, GPU etc within a similar price range, or whether the ones I have stated will indeed do the job, please let me know :)

     

    One final question (that will highlight my lack of tech savvy!), if I did go down this route of upgrading my PC, would I be able to simply plug in my old harddrive and run that as the master harddrive using my version of xp with no problems?

     

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    How bit of a fan would you add to the case?  If it's a 120 mm fan, then that greatly increases your airflow, and should provide adequate cooling for the system.  It helps that a Radeon HD 6850 likely has the best performance per watt of any desktop card on the market, so it actually uses relatively little power for the performance it gives.

    As for the old, larger case, how old is it?  If it's several years old, then it's probably ATX compliant, and you could move everything over and be fine.  If it's a 20 year old case, stuff might not fit properly.  And how big are the two fans that it has?  For a single Radeon HD 6850 system, two 120 mm fans would be plenty that I wouldn't worry about airflow unless something is flagrantly broken, such as the fans not working, or being pressed up against a wall so that no air can go through the vent.

    For a Radeon HD 6850 and a Core 2 Duo, a good quality 400 W power supply should be plenty.  It's quality that matters, not just wattage.  The wattage on a power supply is a marketing number, and not entirely a technical specification, and if you get a "650 W" power supply from a disreputable vendor, it might well explode (sparks, smoke, etc.) if you try to pull 500 W from it, and cause trouble far below that.

    Here's a good deal on a fairly good power supply on that site:

    http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CA-006-XF&groupid=701&catid=123&subcat=1497

    If you find out exactly what motherboard you have, you can check to see if there is a BIOS update available to support newer processors.  If there is, you may be able to just replace the processor, and not also have to replace the motherboard.  This would physically fit in your motherboard:

    http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CP-356-IN

    But it won't work unless there's a suitable BIOS update available.  Note that if you replace the motherboard as well, Windows may demand that you buy a new license, as at that point, it says you've moved it to a different computer entirely, and an OEM license doesn't allow that.

    "It seems to me that the best route would be an entire upgrade of my Mother Board, CPU, RAM and GPU."

    If you're going to do that, then you're probably better off just replacing the computer outright, rather than clinging to a few other parts that aren't very good.  You can keep your old peripherals, of course, but that's a big enough upgrade that if you want to go that route, I'd recommend replacing the case and everything that goes in it.

    -----

    As for combo deals, in order to come out money ahead, every single part in the combo has to be something you want.  For two-item combo deals, that can sometimes happen.  For three or more, it's pretty rare.  Often, a combo deal will have cheap junk parts, or perhaps things that the site wants to get rid of.  Or maybe they'll just be overpriced parts that makes the combo discount still not give a very good deal.

    In the case of the combo deal you found, the processor is a new architecture that even Windows 7 isn't sure what to do with, so it doesn't perform nearly as well as it ought to.  Windows XP would probably be even worse.  The motherboard has a chipset from about two or three generations before the chipsets intended to work with the processor, so AMD doesn't promise that the chipset will work with the processor.  Asus says they can hack it together to work.  And even apart from that, it's a very low end motherboard.

  • locoenoughlocoenough Member Posts: 4

    Hi everyone. I will be extremely grateful if you can help me with answering just 1 question :)

    will I run SWTOR on this "PC" - Intel Celeron E3400 2.6Ghz . 2 GB DDR3 RAM. Nvidia GeForce GT 220 1GB. ???

    and by "will I run" i mean will i run it on normal settings.

    sory for the noob question but I'm not much of a PC gamer and the computer I use is not meant for gameplay , but this is not a game i can miss.  Thanks in advance

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    You didn't specify whether you had a DDR2 or DDR3 version of a GeForce GT 220, and that makes a big difference.  Still, you should be able to run the game well enough to be playable but not entirely smooth at low graphical settings.  At high settings, it won't be playable.

  • locoenoughlocoenough Member Posts: 4

    I'm not sure how to check which version I've got. I ran directx diagnostic tool in start/run... , i have installed cpu-z and this is all what it says in the graphics tab section

     Nvidia GEFORCE GT 220 GT215 40 NM . Core - 405 Shaders - 810 Memory 533 Size - 1024mb

    i cheked on gamedebate and this is the result ... Medium Settings - This system has some slightly weaker components but it should still run Star Wars: The Old Republic on medium settings

    when i had to select my graphic card there was two GeForce 220 options available , one of them was with 1MB written on the side.

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    Originally posted by locoenough

    Memory 533

    Yep, that's the crippled DDR2 version of the card.  Anyway, the game should be playable but not exactly smooth at low graphical settings.  High settings are out of the question.  Both the processor and video card are meaningful limiting factors.  If you had the game, you could probably start with minimum settings, then try turning some things up selectively and seeing what makes the game look better to you and what doesn't.  You'd have some room to turn some things up a ways before the video card was the problem rather than the processor, but you'd still be stuck with fairly low settings.

  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29
    Quizzical - Thank you so much for your continued help/information, greatly appreciated! :) You are saving me from making numerous mistakes! I wouldn't have a clue otherwise.

    What you say about the combo deals does make 100% sense. If I could potentially add a new CPU and RAM without a new motherboard that would be perfect. Would it not matter that I would only have DDR2 and not DDR3 RAM? But

    How do you find out what motherboard is in the PC btw? And whether there is a BIOS update? I have tried reading through the notes/manuals but I can't find a mention about the motherboard.

    I'm not sure if this can be helpful or not, but here's a complete breakdown of my specific PC:

    http://support.dell.com/support/DPP/Index.aspx?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs&ServiceTag=FJWP33J

    If I can simply add a new CPU, GPU, RAM, PSU and 120mm fans without the need of a new motherboard that would be amazing. I will ensure everything is well ventilated.

    I have lowered my 'settings' expectations of Star Wars: TOR, if I can simply manage to upgrade my PC to run the game on medium settings and stable frames-per-second I'll be very happy :)
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    The brand name and model for the motherboard is usually printed on the motherboard.  There will typically be a bunch of writing all over the place marking features, and at least one will say the brand name and the model of the motherboard.  You could open up your case and have a look at the motherboard, and transcribe all of the prominent writing.  (The model will be in fairly large letters, not little tiny stuff.)  If you post 15 lines of text here and only one is the motherboard model, I can tell you which one.

    Once you get the motherboard model, you can go to the manufacturer's web site and search for BIOS updates for that particular model and see what they've got.

    If your motherboard needs DDR2 memory, then any extra memory you buy will have to be DDR2 and not DDR3.  But that's fine, as there is still DDR2 memory available to buy.

  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29
    I think I have found the motherboard make and model. Firstly there was a large serial number: CN-0CU409-73604-77W-00UH.

    However this was always printed on the motherboard: Foxconn G33M02 RU (The 'R' is backwards), which I am guessing is the make and model.

    I will have a check for BIOS updates when I wake up in the morning! Thanks!
  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29
    If the name of the motherboard I mentioned is correct, I believe this is a small breakdown of it:

    http://www.ehow.com/list_7515591_foxconn-g33m02-specifications.html

    However it states I can add up too 8GB DDR2 RAM, however as far as I was aware it only accepted 4GB maximum, hopefully I was wrong.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    Yep, you found it.  Foxconn is a cheap junk brand, so it's no surprise that Dell would use them.  Anyway, here's their page for the motherboard:

    http://www.foxconnchannel.com/product/Motherboards/detail_overview.aspx?ID=en-us0000319

    The site says it supports Intel 45 nm processors.  However, the latest BIOS is dated 8/11/08.  Wolfdale pentium processors first launched on 8/31/08, so support for that is plausible but hardly automatic.  The processor I linked didn't launch until November 2010.  It's only a higher bin (higher base clock speed, possibly later stepping) of the one that launched in 2008, so I'm not sure if anything in the BIOS would have to be changed to support that in particular.

    Some motherboard manufacturers have a complete list of the supported processors, but I don't see one on Foxconn's site.  So basically, I'm not sure if it will work.

  • locoenoughlocoenough Member Posts: 4

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Originally posted by locoenough

    Memory 533

    Yep, that's the crippled DDR2 version of the card.  Anyway, the game should be playable but not exactly smooth at low graphical settings.  High settings are out of the question.  Both the processor and video card are meaningful limiting factors.  If you had the game, you could probably start with minimum settings, then try turning some things up selectively and seeing what makes the game look better to you and what doesn't.  You'd have some room to turn some things up a ways before the video card was the problem rather than the processor, but you'd still be stuck with fairly low settings.

    thank you I think i will buy new pc 

  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Yep, you found it.  Foxconn is a cheap junk brand, so it's no surprise that Dell would use them.  Anyway, here's their page for the motherboard:

    http://www.foxconnchannel.com/product/Motherboards/detail_overview.aspx?ID=en-us0000319

    The site says it supports Intel 45 nm processors.  However, the latest BIOS is dated 8/11/08.  Wolfdale pentium processors first launched on 8/31/08, so support for that is plausible but hardly automatic.  The processor I linked didn't launch until November 2010.  It's only a higher bin (higher base clock speed, possibly later stepping) of the one that launched in 2008, so I'm not sure if anything in the BIOS would have to be changed to support that in particular.

    Some motherboard manufacturers have a complete list of the supported processors, but I don't see one on Foxconn's site.  So basically, I'm not sure if it will work.

     

    Hmm, this is definitely more complex than I thought!

     

    I have found on the Foxconn site a breakdown of the processors that the Motherboard supposedly works with:

     

    http://www.foxconnsupport.com/cpusupportlist.aspx?type=mb&socket=Socket%20775&model=G33M-S&cputype=Intel

     

    According to Foxconn Supporet the Motherboard does indeed support the processor you linked (E6700), which was apparently passed the testing, which is good news!   It also states that it has been verified to work with Wolfdale chips up to E8600 model.

     

    I have decided I can unfortunately only spend a maximum of roughly £280, therefore I think the best option would be to upgrade the CPU, GPU, RAM, PSU and keep the same Motherboard.  If I can spend roughly £100 for a processor, £150 for a GPU, RAM is only an additional £20 and I can get a new PSU as a shiny new birthday present.

     

    Since the motherboard does apparently support Wolfdale chips as well, what processor would you recommend?  Would you still recommend the E6700, or should I spend slightly more money on a Wolfdale E8200 or better?  I can budget roughly £100 towards a processor.

     

    Edit: Since I have a E6550 processor, would the E6700 provide a significant upgrade?  Or should I upgrade to a Wolfdale chip as I mentioned in the previous paragraph?

     

    Edit 2: Another piece of good news concerning processors!  I just updated my BIOS as you recommended, and the latest one was actually released "4/27/2010 ", which would lead me to believe the Motherboard would support the CPU's it states.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    Originally posted by Clifford1987

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Yep, you found it.  Foxconn is a cheap junk brand, so it's no surprise that Dell would use them.  Anyway, here's their page for the motherboard:

    http://www.foxconnchannel.com/product/Motherboards/detail_overview.aspx?ID=en-us0000319

    The site says it supports Intel 45 nm processors.  However, the latest BIOS is dated 8/11/08.  Wolfdale pentium processors first launched on 8/31/08, so support for that is plausible but hardly automatic.  The processor I linked didn't launch until November 2010.  It's only a higher bin (higher base clock speed, possibly later stepping) of the one that launched in 2008, so I'm not sure if anything in the BIOS would have to be changed to support that in particular.

    Some motherboard manufacturers have a complete list of the supported processors, but I don't see one on Foxconn's site.  So basically, I'm not sure if it will work.

     

    Hmm, this is definitely more complex than I thought!

     

    I have found on the Foxconn site a breakdown of the processors that the Motherboard supposedly works with:

     

    http://www.foxconnsupport.com/cpusupportlist.aspx?type=mb&socket=Socket%20775&model=G33M-S&cputype=Intel

     

    According to Foxconn Supporet the Motherboard does indeed support the processor you linked (E6700), which was apparently passed the testing, which is good news!   It also states that it has been verified to work with Wolfdale chips up to E8600 model.

     

    I have decided I can unfortunately only spend a maximum of roughly £280, therefore I think the best option would be to upgrade the CPU, GPU, RAM, PSU and keep the same Motherboard.  If I can spend roughly £100 for a processor, £150 for a GPU, RAM is only an additional £20 and I can get a new PSU as a shiny new birthday present.

     

    Since the motherboard does apparently support Wolfdale chips as well, what processor would you recommend?  Would you still recommend the E6700, or should I spend slightly more money on a Wolfdale E8200 or better?  I can budget roughly £100 towards a processor.

     

    Edit: Since I have a E6550 processor, would the E6700 provide a significant upgrade?  Or should I upgrade to a Wolfdale chip as I mentioned in the previous paragraph?

     

    Edit 2: Another piece of good news concerning processors!  I just updated my BIOS as you recommended, and the latest one was actually released "4/27/2010 ", which would lead me to believe the Motherboard would support the CPU's it states.

    Whoa now.  The processor I linked is a Pentium E6700, which is not on that list.  It's not at all the same thing as the Core 2 Duo E6700 that is on the list.  Now, it might still work.  I'm not sure how much the BIOS needs to know in order to support different bins of the same die.  But the Pentium E6000 series is different from the E5000 series, as the 6000 series has a faster FSB.  It's the same faster FSB as the Core 2 Duo E7000 series that the motherboard does support, but those have more L2 cache.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,975

    Originally posted by locoenough

    Originally posted by Quizzical


    Originally posted by locoenough

    Memory 533

    Yep, that's the crippled DDR2 version of the card.  Anyway, the game should be playable but not exactly smooth at low graphical settings.  High settings are out of the question.  Both the processor and video card are meaningful limiting factors.  If you had the game, you could probably start with minimum settings, then try turning some things up selectively and seeing what makes the game look better to you and what doesn't.  You'd have some room to turn some things up a ways before the video card was the problem rather than the processor, but you'd still be stuck with fairly low settings.

    thank you I think i will buy new pc 

    If you're going to buy a new computer, then post about what you plan on getting here before you make the purchase.  You don't want to buy something at random and then find out that it's a piece of junk, or even that it's decently nice but you overpaid by $500.

  • bigcheeseukbigcheeseuk Member UncommonPosts: 125

    I ran it on an old lappy with similar specs, with a slightly more powerful 8600GTm vid card, runs with everything set on low or off and on a lower resolution than the desktop. You can play it but it's hardly fluid and eye candy-ish.

  • Clifford1987Clifford1987 Member Posts: 29
    Bigcheeseuk - What specs are those exactly please? Do you mean similar specs to my current specs or the ones I am looking to upgrade too?

    Quizzical - Sorry about that, my lack of computer knowledge kicking in again, and I thought I was finally catching on! So the one you posted is newer than all the processors listed on the list of compatible processors?

    Out of the list of processors that are listed as being 100% compatible, is there any processors that would potentially do the job I would require? Or are they all too old?

    Once again thank you so much for your help! I know it must be trying talking to someone with 0% computer knowledge, you've been a great help.
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